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I STILL DO
Judith Fox

September 25 - December 16, 2010
Artist Talk, Book Signing & Reception: December 8, 6:00-8:00pm

"I am telling my story so that someone else will be more comfortable telling their own. Photographing the man I love is an intimate process. When I watch Ed through my camera lens, despite the distance of several feet between us, I feel as though I am caressing him. My camera isn’t an obstruction, it’s another way of touching him.” Judith Fox


ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

A poignant and beautiful portrait of a man with Alzheimer’s as seen through the loving lens and words of his wife and care-partner, I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer's puts a human face in front of the statistics, exploring the disease through Fox’s intimate photographs and poetic writing. While the details of I Still Do are personal and unique, this deeply candid story of illness, aging, partnership, and loving is universal.

Three years into their marriage, Judith Fox’s husband, Dr. Edmund Ackell, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Over the course of the next ten years, Fox watched as the man who used to perform surgery, fly planes, and run universities, forgot how to turn on the coffee maker, place a phone call, or remember what his wife had told him two minutes earlier. More than five million Americans have Alzheimer’s.

Fox’s accomplishment with this sensitive, moving and lyrical series about one of the most vexing and difficult problems we face in the modern era, never loses sight of the actual lives, personalities and identities impacted. It is very hard to remain impassive in the face of her story of her husband's current life with her. I Still Do is an important contribution to the field and represents a significant achievement in contemporary photography and for Judith as a photographer.

“When my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s 11 years ago, the stigma and misinformation surrounding the disease added a ponderous weight to our daily challenges. Initially, we felt alone; eventually we found a support group, and were helped by others who were traveling with us on our unwanted journey. We learned from each other’s experiences and we were warmed by our connections.

I am telling my story so that someone else will be more comfortable telling their own. Photographing the man I love is an intimate process. When I watch Ed through my camera lens, despite the distance of several feet between us, I feel as though I am caressing him. My camera isn’t an obstruction, it’s another way of touching him.”Judith Fox


  “Our stories ground us.
We select them, we edit them,
and we tell them to others
in order to explain ourselves.
Ed is losing his story.

Once Ed and I started living with Alzheimer’s,
we began a trip down a never-ending staircase.
Here and there we’ve found a platform
and rested for a while.
Then there was another step down.
And another.
Right now Ed and I are tumbling feet-over-head.
No platforms in sight.
A nightmare.

No matter where Ed lives in this world,
he will never again feel at home.
The floors have collapsed, the ceilings have opened,
the walls buckled.
Our house can no longer be counted upon
to give him stable shelter and protection.”

“Her camera records not just faces and places, but moments, expressions, relationships, gestures, and meanings as well. The art of the photograph—an art she continues to feel so deeply—is that it can capture the emotion as well as the form. Of the millions of photographs that families take of their loved ones who face this unkind fate, how many are capable of completing the equation and transmitting their feelings of loss and fear and despair in the way that Judith’s images do, time and time again? Photographers return from battlefields and natural disasters with images of casualties and destruction often. But how many of them take us beyond and through the physical destruction and have us feel the devastation to the heart and soul as well. Such is the power of Judith’s view into Ed’s heart as well as her own.” Roy L. Flukinger, Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas.


ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Judith Fox has always had two careers: one as an artist and one as an entrepreneur. After working as a photographer, writer and business executive in New York, Fox started a service company in Virginia that expanded in size and reputation. Her NPR program, On the Job, ran in Virginia and Washington, D.C. After selling her company, she devoted herself full-time to photography. Fox's award-winning photographs have been in solo and group shows in London, New York, Los Angeles and other major US cities. Fox has been interviewed on numerous television and radio shows and featured in dozens of newspapers and magazines including Library Journal, ELLE, Bottom Line/Health, Forbes Woman, ForeWord and Spirituality & Health. Her photographs are in the permanent collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Photographic Arts and the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin; as well as private and corporate collections throughout the United States and Europe. I Still Do was published by powerHouse Books in 2009.


 
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Exhibitions and programs at the Southeast Museum of Photography are supported in part by Daytona State College, Volusia ECHO and the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on the Arts.

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