SMP logo



Bookmark and Share

LOGO IMAGE


ANTHOLOGY 2012
October 5, 2012 - February 3, 2013

Friday, October 5, 6:00-8:00pm
Opening Reception and Artist's Talk with Lauren Henkin and Jennifer Schlesinger-Hanson
Student Seminar: Thursday, October 4, 11:00am - Photography School Lecture Theater, Bldg. 530. Rm. 118



Lauren Henkin, External 15, 2012 from the series "Growth" (Pigment Print)
  The range and breadth of styles, techniques, themes and subject matter used by contemporary photographers presents a broadening and a deepening of the field of serious photography in ways that have re-energized and stimulated the entire profession. It was not so many years ago that so-called serious art photographers had just a few accepted styles, areas of practice and working methods that would be embraced by the worlds of museums, galleries, or in art publishing.

The photographers exhibited in Anthology 2012 represent much of this new range and are producing some of the most significant new work that is starting to have an impact in the field. All of the artists are entering the solid core of their careers as their style and subject matter matures to reflect the concerns of a new generation of artists.
a
Jennifer Schlesinger-Hanson, Object Diaspora 1, 2009 (Silver Gelatin Print)
  Photographers Represented in Anthology 2012:

Anderson and Low
Mary Ellen Bartley
Jean-Christian Bourcart
John Chakeres
Dominic Chavez
Scott Dalton
Nicola Dill
Eliot Dudik
Judith Fox
Toni Greaves
Lauren Henkin
Alexandra Huddleston
Lisa Kessler




Alex Leme
Emma Livingston
Graham Miller
Jeffrey Milstein
Daniel Mirer
Dianora Niccolini
David Pace
Philipp Scholz Rittermann
David Rochkind
Jennifer Schlesinger-Hanson
Brad Temkin
Shen Wei

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHERS:

Anthology 2012
  Anderson and Low
“Photographing the internal and external details of architecture revealed Modernist ideals and aesthetics. Referencing nature, mathematics, colour theory, world cultures, art history, modernism and previous abstract works, Anderson & Low have created a project that is both contemporary and timeless.”--From the exhibition introduction, Light and Sie, Dallas.

image to the left: Bella Donna, 2007 from the series "Chrysalis" (Dye Coupler Print)

Anthology 2012
  Mary Ellen Bartley
“In Standing Open, I visit photography books as they stand open before my camera, using their chance settling and a full-frame, close-up view to see them in a new way, as my gaze falls into and out of the books, and into and out of abstraction. This work interests me on many levels. First, there is the beauty of the interior space and structure of the books, and the unique formal discoveries found from looking at them close-up. The stripes the pages create, the shadowy voids between pages that read like burns or stains, and the reflections the photos can make on the pages facing them are among the repeating formal motifs.”

image to the left: Utatane from the series "Standing Open" (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Jean-Christian Bourcat
  Jean-Christian Bourcart
“There are always traffic jams on Canal Street. The people behind the tinted windows of their large sedans look melancholy and resigned. Others, in buses and taxis, appear bored, overwhelmed by the long day. I stand on the sidewalk, examining them with a powerful telephoto lens. I watch them watching me, incredulous, stupefied, like an animal caught in a car’s headlights at night. Some of them don’t move. Others try to turn away, protect themselves with a newspaper or their hand.”—Jean-Christian Bourcat in an interview with Brigitte Ollier, 2004.

image to the left: Untitled #15, 2002, New York from the series "Traffic" (Dye Coupler Print)

John Chakeres
  John Chakeres
“Too often photography is defined in social terms, taking the interests, and/or needs of the viewer into account, and relying on external context or history for meaning. My photographs don’t function within this paradigm. They are about line, shape, form, color, surface, and light. I look at the world and think in terms of beauty and order as primal forces. Those forces define every decision I make when creating an image. Each wall begins as a canvas, a two-dimensional surface; a foundation on which to build an image. My photographs exist within themselves, detailed portraits of the crossroads where art and technology meet. The images are about what photography does; its ability to record detail with great clarity and definition.”

image to the left: Painted Wall (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Dominic Chavez
“Photography has taken me to many places over the years; my first steps as an artist were focused on developing the craft, learning to see, feel and understand the foundation of light, composition and the magic moments that define and give pictures an infinite life. I have found that the most powerful images consist of the rich details that emerge from the human experience: images that breathe with emotions and are still carefully crafted. I feel a responsibility to create my work with respect and the understanding that pictures are the middle voice in creating dialogue.”

image to the left: Untitled from the series "World Health" (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Scott Dalton
“This documentary photo project explores the people and places that inspired the work of Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel García Márquez. García Márquez was born and raised in Aracataca, a small town on Colombia's Caribbean coast. For his writing, he drew from his childhood, his hometown, and the people and places nestled along Colombia's coastal region, weaving them into the famous masterwork he titled One Hundred Years of Solitude. The novel captivated the world and established the genre of magical realism, which became a potent international force in literature, film, and art ever since. The setting and centerpiece of One Hundred Years of Solitude is the fictional town of Macondo. With its surreal charm, it represents the uniqueness of Colombia: eccentric and eclectic, timeless and earthy, a place where truth and fiction, myth and reality merge.”

image to the left: Night Swim, 2006 (Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Nicola Dill
“In the series Sea Etchings, I search for musical nuances within the landscape. I am drawn to the expressive nature of lines and the evocative quality lying beneath. Less concerned with a literal interpretation, the work speaks to an intangible sensation perceived about the subject matter. My interest lies within the metaphorical and subliminal experience of the moment by giving pause to expressions of joy, playfulness, lightness, innocence, and mystery. These ‘temporary etchings’ seem to reflect upon something vulnerable; they elicit the endless realm of personal association.”

image to the left: Trail of Thoughts #51, 2007 from the series "Sea Etchings" (Archival Pigment Print)

Anthology 2012
  Eliot Dudik
“Change is descending upon an otherwise quiet, unhurried, unobtrusive, place. The main highway, U.S Route 17, that bisects South Carolina's "low country," north to south, is being widened to accommodate commerce, tourists, and urban refugees. Not only are many homes, some historic, disappearing before the tracked blades of expansion, but also the new, faster thoroughfare encourages greater disregard and obliviousness to the charm and culture the basin harbors."

image to the left:
Condemned, Ashepoo River, 2010 from the series "Road Ends in Water" (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012

  Judith Fox
“The photography series, Sea of Dreams, is part of a trilogy that has been created over a period of ten years. The photographs are all taken from the same balcony overlooking the Pacific Ocean— but they have been taken during different seasons, different times of day and under different weather conditions. These are studies of people immersed in this dynamic ocean or on the shore as they unselfconsciously come together, drift apart, and play with unabashed freedom and innocence. Observed from a distance, the people in the photographs remain anonymous, but the characteristics and attitudes revealed in the images celebrate the singular personality of the individual.”

image to the left: Untitled #8609, 2009 from the series "Sea-of-Dreams" (Dye Coupler Print)

Anthology 2012
  Toni Greaves
Radical Love: The Sisters of Summit, NJ.
“Twenty-one year-old Lauren Franko was in college, leading a rich and full life out in ‘the World,’ as she calls it. She had a boyfriend and plans for marriage and children. But instead of this seemingly known path, she felt called to religious life and, has chosen to live her life as a cloistered nun. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm, and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. Pale-skinned, rosy-cheeked Sister Lauren is young, beautiful, and vibrant. Although in her early 20’s; her child-like energy defies her age and exposes a curious juxtaposition of a girl finding herself as a woman, while at the same time finding herself as a nun.”

image to the left: Love, 2008 from the series "Radical Love" (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Lauren Henkin
“Like my previous projects, this series, which began in 2009, connects an internal experience with the external. It focuses more on the urban landscape, with images of trees, weeds, shrubs and other vegetation growing in places where they shouldn’t be. For the last eight years I’ve struggled with health issues related to invasive growths in my own body. I was drawn to these urban growths because they persevere. Emerging through asphalt, suffocated by electrical wires, trapped between buildings, standing proud even in defeat, they are both accommodating and unyielding.

I didn’t make a connection between what I was seeing on my camera ground glass and what was inside me until I visited the studio of a fellow artist and examined some x-rays she had hanging. Immediately, it made sense. I was connecting that which I had tracked for so long in my body with similar tales of survival in the external landscape. These humble subjects, ones I found beautiful, would enable me to let go of the fear and willingly accept these aggressive beings that will, most likely, be in me for the rest of my life. I needed to change my perception of what is “invasive” — to find some kind of respect for anything that persists in growth, no matter what the environment.”

image to the left: External 7, 2012 from the series "Growth" (Pigment Print)

Anthology 2012
  Alexandra Huddleston
333 Saints: A Life of Scholarship Under Threat
333 Saints: A Life of Scholarship works as a bridge between the Islamic culture of West Africa and a Western audience. The heart of the story is about the deep respect and veneration for education, history, and the written word in the scholarly life of Timbuktu, a small, legendary city on the edge of the Sahara Desert in the Republic of Mali. The cultural life of the community revolves around its tradition of Islamic scholarship and the priceless manuscript libraries this scholarly life created. The title of the project – “333 Saints” – comes from the profound conviction in the Islamic culture of Timbuktu that to be a saint is, by definition, to be a man or woman of knowledge, whether by long study or by divine inspiration.”

image to the left: 333 Saints #7 (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Lisa Kessler
Seeing Pink is an exploration into the idea of the color pink in America. The documentary photographs interpret the myriad connotations we attach to pink, a color burdened by dogma. These documentary photographs examine our notions of what is real and what is fake, what is biologically determined and what is socially created. Pink is simply a color, but it is also an idea, one that confines and liberates, and ultimately holds a mirror to our culture. Pink is the color of love and sweetness and vulnerability, but also of power, eccentricity, and pornography.”

image to the left: Shower from the series "Pink" (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Alex Leme
“With the gradual but steady rise of agri-business, the loss of small, family-owned and run farms, and the century-long exodus of rural populations to urban centers, farming communities have been suffering a slow and painful decline for decades. Loss of jobs, economically shattered families, failed businesses and a general malaise of perceived worthlessness are common features of conversations that run through many small towns in America. Although these towns are often located just outside major metropolises, the realities of their social and economic landscapes are worlds apart.”

image to the left:
Globe, 2009 from the series "Small Town" (Digital Dye Coupler Print)

Anthology 2012
  Emma Livingston
“I began this series of Tree Portraits in January 2008. These trees are from one area (barrio) of Buenos Aires. I treat each tree as an individual, centering them in the composition as I would a person. The tree is the protagonist. I am intrigued by how each one has a personality of its own. An expression conveyed through its size, build, ‘posture’; the ‘attitude’ expressed through the display of its branches. I find there are parallels between the trees and us: their individuality as well as the sense of fate. How they have been fated to grow or not, flourish or suffer, and ultimately die within this urban environment of concrete walls and pollution.”

image to the left: Tree Portrait #8 (Dye Coupler Print)

Anthology 2012
  Graham Miller
Suburban Splendour emerged from encounters observed whilst driving, from focused observation of daily life, from eavesdropping and casual conversation, but more often than not the photographs were inspired by literature and cinema. Films by Paul Thomas Anderson and Ray Lawrence contributed, as did writing by Richard Ford and the lyrics of Paul Kelly. But the background soundtrack which remained constant was the voice of the American short story writer Raymond Carver. Carver’s vision depicts ordinary people living lives of quiet desperation, people who are feeling their way in the dark with the hope that maybe next week things will get better. These images depict everyday struggle and ordinary tragedy. We look back on our lives and consider missed opportunities, and contemplate the uneasy feeling that we have turned out to be someone other than who we had previously imagined.”

image to the left: Rhonda and Chantrelle from the series "Suburban Splendour" (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012   Jeffrey Milstein
“My hope is that these photographs offer a poetic glimpse of this frozen-in-time yet optimistic island. I was taken with the richness and beauty of the faded architecture that was once so grand and opulent. The decay and sculptural forms within speak to layers of history and the inevitability of change. No matter how hard we try, everything, even our own bodies, slowly decays, but the effect can be very beautiful.”

image to the left: Chess Game, Havana, Cuba, 2004 (Digital Print)

Daniel Mirer
  Daniel Mirer
“The ArchitorSpace photographs display my interest in and fear of the banality of spaces in enclosed areas within post-industrial architecture. These places are typologies of contemporary post-industrial architectural aesthetic that makes the individual appear so displaced within the uncanny. The photographic strategy is to purposefully make these images heavy with absence; forgotten places that are entirely familiar. These deserted (non-site) environments reveal no history or functionality. Tunnels, corridors and lobbies that exist in the images are the enclosed public arenas in which you are viewed and exposed to the scrutiny of others.”

image to the left: Fluorescent Staircase, Tokyo, Japan (Dye Coupler Print)

Anthology 2012
  Dianora Niccolini
”I am … considered by many to be the female pioneer of the male nude in photography, a trend-setter. Photographing the male nude now is commonplace, but a quarter of a century ago it was a different matter. It was not considered an art form but rather was relegated to homoerotic pornography. Homosexual men had always photographed their lovers since the onset of photography. Not too many women dared. If they did, few showed their work publicly. However, gay magazines were full of photographic images of sexy men. Fine art galleries refused to exhibit male nude photographs until I had my male nude exhibit, in 1975 at The Third Eye Gallery in NYC. The male nude in photography was finally legitimized and accepted by the art community. The fact that I was a woman helped to de-stigmatize it.”

image to the left: Untitled, 1982 (Silver Gelatin Print)

David Pace
  David Pace
“I first traveled to Burkina Faso in 2007 and became enamored of the people and the daily life of this little-known part of the world. I live in Bereba, a small village without electricity or running water. The landscape is flat and can be uninteresting, especially in the dry season, when it appears pale and monochromatic. But the people are vibrant and engaging. They are what drew me to this remote village and keep me coming back. They possess an intensity, a directness and a sense of style that I find endlessly fascinating. I have made many distinct series of portraits over the past six years. I give no directions other than where to stand.”

image to the left: Market Day 5, 2011 (Pigment Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012   Philipp Scholz Rittermann
"A scene is captured in multiple overlapping frames, in single or multiple rows, depending on the height and width of the space, and the length of time during which I want to record what's happening. This can make for an image set of thirty to over sixty images which then need to be stitched together in software. The file can be made to contain blended planes, as well as individual layers for each contributing frame. The content of these individual layers can then be masked or revealed, to fine-tune the sutures between frames. A group of captures from a session is akin to a data set which, depending on how one slices through it, is capable of revealing different relationships between objects moving through a space at different times.”

image to the left:
Young Men & Qing Emperor, Red Pavilion, Yangliuqing, Tianjin City, China from the series "Emperor's River"


Anthology 2012
  David Rochkind
“Mexico is a country in crisis. The government is battling the drug cartels, the drug cartels are battling each other, and there is a palpable fear across the nation. Corruption exists throughout the state and complaints of human rights abuses by the army are widespread. The line between criminals and the authorities is so blurred that the average citizen fears everyone. These photographs attempt to move beyond simple depictions of carnage to explore the stress and tension that is left in the wake of such violence and illustrate how this conflict will impact and handicap Mexico’s future. The wounds of this war bleed into every corner of the country, staining the very fabric of Mexican life with violence, death and fear.”

image to the left: Train from the series "Heavy Hand, Sunken Spirit" (Digital Dye Coupler print)

Anthology 2012
  Jennifer Schlesinger-Hanson
Biographical video of Schlesinger-Hanson’s photographic art from 2003-2012.
Object Diaspora presents photographs of objects that have been passed between people and families over time and have become imbued with a special meaning, significance and value. The objects come to embody, often, the spirit and memory of the person who originally possessed them and are given an almost “sacred” status by their current owners. Like people who migrate from one country to another looking to begin a new life, these objects travel, get placed in a new environment and become part of their new culture. We breathe our spirit into these objects, and we use them with the spirit of the person who gave them to us. The images in Here Nor There are my interpretations of the first magical and mysterious moments of inspiration. In between the normal “adult” reality and the purely imaginative one of a child there is another kind of magic. It is a mystery and curiosity for the unknown that has enchanted humans and led to their belief in religion and a spiritual path. It is the inexplicable place that lies somewhere between here and there.”

image to the left: #11, 2011 from the series " Here Nor There" (Unique selenium toned, hand-coated albumen print)

Anthology 2012
  Brad Temkin
Relics began out of personal experience of my own mortality. I was reminded of time and timelessness. I realized that things are not what they seem in spite of my misconception. In making these pictures my hope is to symbolize the mark humans leave on the landscape by showing our impermanent, yet lingering presence. The forms I choose in tandem with my composition exude an energy that transcends the originating intentions of the builders. These objects become beautiful and monumental ‘earth works’. They are visceral reminders of where we have been and what we are.”

image to the left: Relics VII, 2006 (Inkjet Print)

Anthology 2012
  Shen Wei
Almost Naked is a series of portraits exploring identity and sexuality in America. Inspired by my upbringing in conservative China, and motivated by my passion to understand the complexity of emotion, desire, introspection and instinct.”

image to the left: James, 2007 from the series "Almost Naked" (Dye Coupler Print)



Current Exhibitions | Upcoming Exhibitions | Past Exhibitions | Traveling Exhibitions


HOME NEWS EXHIBITIONS PROGRAMS EDUCATION COLLECTION INFORMATION VISIT CONTACT

The Southeast Museum of Photography is a service of Daytona State College
1200 W. International Speedway Blvd. (Building 1200) Daytona Beach, FL, 32114, (386) 506-4475
Free Admission & Parking

Click HERE for museum hours of operation


Daytona State College prohibits discrimination and assures equal opportunity in employment and education services to all individuals without regard to age, ancestry, belief, color, disability, ethnicity, genetic information, gender, marital status, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sex, and veteran status. For more details, read our Equal Opportunity Statement or contact: Job B. Clement, Chair of the Equity Committee at 386-506-3403 or 1200 W. International Speedway Blvd., Daytona Beach, Fl. 32114.